omgthatdress:

Evening Dress
Jacques Doucet, 1905-1910
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Evening Dress

Jacques Doucet, 1905-1910

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

vivelareine:

Caroline Sihol as Marie Antoinette and Léa Gabrielle as Rosalie Lamorlière in Je m’appelais Marie Antoinette

[source: my scan/collection]

omgthatdress:

Suit
Jacques Doucet, 1895
The Victoria & Albert Museum

omgthatdress:

Suit

Jacques Doucet, 1895

The Victoria & Albert Museum

omgthatdress:

Ball Gown
Jacques Doucet, 1898-1902
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Ball Gown

Jacques Doucet, 1898-1902

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

straitlaceddame:

lucy-corsetry:

The first two illustrations are mere speculation of the position of a tightlacer’s organs, drawn by an artist who only had a basic knowledge of anatomy, during a time when Germ Theory was not even widely accepted.

The second two photos are real MRI scans of modern tightlacer Eden Berlin, in a non-ferrous corset made by TO.mTO, presented by Dr. Eckhart von Hirschhausen. Liver and stomach are slightly shifted above the waist, and the morphology of the liver is barely changed. Kidneys and lungs show no notable change either. The most affected organ is the large intestine, which by nature is flexible and easily flattens/ moves aside - otherwise peristalsis, pregnancy, yoga or basic twisting or movement of the torso would be impossible.

For more info, I’ve written a post about it on my website here.

It’s time to stop perpetuating baseless myths about how corsets affect your internal organs and look to modern science.

This is probably the most important thing I’ve reblogged all year.  I’d like to think this will stir more modern scientific demonstrations on the subject!

Before you ask, check out my FAQ page. You might find your answer there!